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2017: Community Conversations:
Criminal Justice, Yesterday and Today

The first Community Conversations event was held at the Ossining Library on Oct. 5. The distinguished panel, from left to right, moderator Brent Glass, senior adviser to the Sing Sing Museum Project, Sean Pica, executive director of Hudson Link for Higher Education in Prison, Cheryl Roberts of the Greenburger Center for Social and Criminal Justice, and historian Roger Panetta, Professor Emeritus at Fordham University.

The second Community Conversations event was held at the New Rochelle Public Library on Oct. 10. From left to right on the panel, Charles Lewis, program coordinator for the Coming Home program, Janet Donat of Family Services of Westchester, director of the EMERGE program at the Westchester County Department of Correction, Elizabeth Gaynes, executive director of the Osborne Association, and Sister Tesa Fitzgerald, executive director of Hour Children.

The third Community Conversations event was held at Yonkers Riverfront Library on Oct. 12. From left to right on the panel, Brian Fischer, former superintendent of Sing Sing and former Commissioner of the New York State Department of Corrections and Community Supervision; Katherine Vockins, executive director of Rehabilitation Through the Arts, located in Katonah, and Charles Moore, the alumni coordinator for Rehabilitation Through the Arts.

The fourth Community Conversations event was held at Yonkers Grinton Will Library on Oct. 17. From left to right on the panel, Brent Glass, senior adviser to the Sing Sing Museum Project, Martin F. Horn is Distinguished Lecturer in Corrections at the John Jay College, City University of New York and serves as executive director of the New York State Permanent Commission on Sentencing, and Justin D. Pruyne, Esq., deputy commissioner of the Westchester County Department of Correction.

The Sing Sing Prison Museum, to be constructed in the 1825 Cellblock located just outside the Sing Sing Correctional Facility, aspires to join a network of more than 200 historic sites and museums around the world whose mission is to encourage awareness and empathy, promote civic engagement and raise important questions about justice and injustice.

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Throughout the month of October, the Foundation supported, in partnership with the Westchester Library System, a series of Community Conversations to provide information and history about the Sing Sing Prison and engage audiences in dialogue on social justice, mass incarceration, and re-entry.  Brent Glass, Director Emeritus of the Smithsonian National Museum of American History, moderated each panel discussion. At each conversation, Dana White, the Ossining Village Historian, presented the history of the prison in the world at large and in the village of Ossining.

The fifth Community Conversations event was held at the John C. hart Memorial Library on October 26. Here, Brent Glass describes the Sing Sing Prison Museum project to the crowd. Members of the panel were Barbara Lambros, Westchester County Re-entry Coordinator for the Westchester County Re-entry Task Force; Justin D. Pruyne, Esq., Deputy Commissioner of the Westchester County Department of Correction; and Edmundo Varela, Assistant Commissioner, Westchester County Probation.

The sixth and final Community Conversations event was held at the Mount Kisco Public Library on Oct. 28. From left to right on the panel, Tamaris Princi, Abusive Partner Intervention Coordinator with the Urban Resource Institute, Charles Lewis, program coordinator for the Coming Home program, and Dr. Kimberly Collica-Cox, associate professor in the Criminal Justice and Security Program at Pace University.